Injured at Work? Don’t Forget About Your Superannuation Fund

Most Australians know that they can file a workers compensation claim if they get hurt on the job. But did you know that may not be your only option? You may also be able to make a claim through your superannuation account. This is because superannuation programmes generally offer various types of insurance coverage. This article provides a basic overview to familiarise you with this issue.

In general, insurance provided through your superannuation will provide coverage for any illness or accident resulting in an injury that prevents you from working.  However, one of the most fundamental and crucial issues to understand in this context is that there may be different rules associated with the insurance provided through different superannuation programmes.

Some funds will only offer insurance to active members – those who are making contributions – while others will continue to provide cover once you’ve stopped contributing.  In some cases you won’t be eligible for the coverage unless you ‘opt-in’. If your superannuation fund offers ‘default cover’ for its members, however, you will automatically qualify for the coverage. Many policies also allow you to make a claim even if you are no longer working and are not currently insured – but only if you were covered at the time you were hurt.

Another important point to bear in mind is that just because you have coverage, it doesn’t mean your claim will be successful. It is not unheard of for a fund to deny a claim without a valid reason, and so it is essential that you consult an experienced lawyer prior to pursuing this option.

The Types of Claims Available

A lawyer who is well versed in this area can do a comprehensive review of your situation and discuss what you must do in order to prove total and permanent disability (TPD).  A TPD claim is one in which you must demonstrate that you can no longer do the type of work you were doing when you were hurt, or any type of work for which you are qualified based on your education, training or experience.

The reason this is so critical is that TDP, or ‘disability cover’, is the type of insurance coverage most often offered as ‘default cover’ by superannuation funds. Furthermore, successful TPD claims typically result in single (lump sum) payments rather than payments made over time. How much you will get depends on several factors including the extent of your injury and your policy terms.

Depending on your unique circumstances and the provisions in your superannuation insurance policy, you may also be able to make claims for temporary disability or income insurance.  If you make a successful claim for the former, you’ll most likely get monthly payments until you can resume working. A successful income insurance claim usually results in compensation for up to 80 percent of your average income, with payments being made for a maximum of two years. You should also be aware that you can usually make these types of claims through your superannuation fund even if you’re already receiving reimbursement through workers compensation, and that you can make your superannuation insurance and workers compensation claims simultaneously.

More Than One Super Fund?

Another question that often arises in this context is what you should do if you have more than one superannuation account. If you follow conventional wisdom, you may be tempted to combine all of your accounts so you don’t have to pay any fees or premiums on any funds not in active use. That can be detrimental for insurance purposes, however, because different superannuation insurance programmes have different rules. If you combine all of your accounts without getting the proper advice, you may end up with insurance that doesn’t meet your needs.

In summary, if you have a superannuation account, you also have options if you are hurt at work. In addition to pursuing a claim through workers compensation, you may also be able to make a claim through the insurance associated with your super fund. Because different insurance plans offered through superannuation funds have different rules, you may have to opt-in to ensure that you have cover. In most cases, you will probably have ‘default cover’ as an active participant in a super fund but in order to make a successful claim with this type of insurance, you must usually prove that you have TPD. Finally, you should always consult a qualified professional about the insurance ramifications before you consolidate multiple superannuation accounts.

If you have been hurt at work and you want to know more about your options for seeking compensation through your super fund, it is important to get proper legal advice as soon as possible. Contact us for a free case evaluation now.